Select Page
Practice is the Key – Why You Have To Replace Dreams With Practice

Practice is the Key – Why You Have To Replace Dreams With Practice

The thing about having a dream, or even just setting a big goal, is that it can stop you in your tracks. You freeze. I’ll show you how practice is the key.

“I don’t know if I could ever do that!”

“That just seems unrealistic. How am I ever going to start?”

A voice that you hear finds every possible doubt that lingers in the energy of your thoughts, (and that’s all that your thoughts are, after all).

The result is that you stay motionless. Motivation deserts you as you look across the dream chasm, unable to move.

“I’ll never manage that. I just don’t have the talent.”

We give ourselves plenty of justification as to why that particular goal or vision is too unattainable and how we should just stay where we are. It’s often because our psyche seeks safety and comfort it prefers staying put and not moving at all.

Inaction.

“I can’t really change this relationship, I should just stay where I am.”

But beware of the shoulds. Mike Dooley often talks about the ‘cursed hows’. Well I’m talking about the ‘loathsome shoulds’.

There is a really good way to tackle them and to move from inaction to action. To render the ‘loathsome shoulds’ impotent.

Through doing the practice.

Doing the practice is making the small steps without worrying about the big G-O-A-L.

Put your helmet on and start doing the thing that will begin to shape the dream. It’s not the final dream vision itself, but the fuel that will run the engine to get there.

If it’s writing, then write; building a website, then start working with code,;meditating then start sitting and following your breath.

I always tell people who I work with that when you practice you are not on stage, therefore practice isn’t the performance. You don’t have to look good and you don’t have to impress anyone or gain approval.

You are practicing, pure and simple.

Work out the kinks, find your voice, play with the line and see where it takes you.

Doing the practice builds your discipline and gives you a path. Don’t look for the top of the mountain yet. Watch your feet and find the footholds in front of you.

Keep moving.

This isn’t being busy for busy’s sake, or spinning your wheels to give you the illusion that you are working. This is building a habit of practice that will carry you almost unnoticeably forward with a quiet certainty.

Each day moving. Each day doing the practice.

The Spiral Concept

The Spiral Concept

 

Taking a circle of drummers through transformation is a life changing event.

The circle gives us equanimity and clarity. It allows us open communication and connection.

Not sitting behind desks or standing in lines; instead a limitless path.

Now take the circle and twist it in on itself to give a spiral. Allow the drummers to overlap each other as they play.

Hear the overlap, the fields of rhythm. Plant a starting rhythm at the centre point of the spiral and let it travel outwards along the curve from player to player and drum to drum.

Once the rhythm is breathing by itself take the spiral on a journey, let it move and spin.

Feel the rhythms sweeping from the centre to the edges and let the momentum build and the energy rise.

Keep playing.

Let the spiral expand like a galaxy and unfold out into the room. Keep playing and listening.

When the expansion is complete join the ends together and bring everyone on back to the circle of one.

Connect together and breathe.

How to Find Your Theme

How to Find Your Theme

I’m a masher and my work is a mash-up.

There are so many strands to include, sometimes I don’t even know what I do. In fact, there are definitely people at my work who don’t really get what I do.

So I try to work with the key themes that I find cropping up often.

You might be the same and want to ask yourself: ‘What are your themes?’

If you are anything like me then your multi-stranded themes can give you the edge in the workplace and in your business. Instead of a grey-scale worker, you are a kaleidoscope. Instead of pursuing a single discipline you’re a masher.

Here are some of the things that I’ve worked at:

Drummer, Recording Artist, Jazz Improvisor, Coach, Mentor, Education Consultant, Performer, Studio Owner, Producer, Blogger, Composer, Author, Publisher, Web Designer, Writer, Teacher Trainer, Educator, Workshop Leader, Group Facilitator

Now, whenever I’m in new networking situations, I’ve started revealing more and more about the range of things that I can do.

I used to move from one group to the next adjusting the persona that I projected out and trying to fit in by editing my history and accommodating who was around me.

It’s tricky to do, especially when each person asks you: ‘So what do you do?’

But there is a way of finding a number of themes that incorporate all of your skills and passions and allows others to connect with you.

It’s actually okay if no-one actually understands what you do.

I want to celebrate that I did web design for an international charity and worked as a band technician on the Jools Holland Show. The skills that I offer allowed me to spend six weeks writing songs at a local hospice and to also write and publish several books.

The days of the single job title and linear career path are over and the future belongs instead to those with a sense of their own themes.

My themes now are improvisation, play and creativity and how we can use them in our personal and work lives to find greater freedom, happiness and energy.